Picking a fight with a saying: ‘The whole is greater than the sum of its parts’

Used when something turns out to be really impressive, it’s supposed to be a positive thing to say. I get it, and that the intention behind it is good, but there are three nagging aspects of this saying that really rub me up the wrong way. It’s a silly and particularly pedantic hill on which… Continue reading Picking a fight with a saying: ‘The whole is greater than the sum of its parts’

Addressing needs with unusual tactics: What if we had to use postcards?

This is a deliberately silly exercise, in the vein of Brian Eno’s Oblique Strategies. A method of throwing out all the seemingly obvious things you should be trying to solve a (service design or interaction design) problem, and looking at it from another angle. With ‘what if we had to use postcards’, it’s a bit… Continue reading Addressing needs with unusual tactics: What if we had to use postcards?

Fartlek

I found this term hilarious the first time my PE teacher taught me about it. He explained that it was Swedish for ‘speed play’, and that it meant walking for a bit, then jogging, then sprinting, then walking again, and so on. A way to train the body in a more beneficial way than just… Continue reading Fartlek

For the love of desire paths

I’ve always liked desire paths. Even before I knew what they were called. At art collage I remember watching people take multiple routes across a square area of grass, but never around it. I liked the people watching element. And the way the paths effectively let you people watch after the fact. The documentary element.… Continue reading For the love of desire paths

Have you read? Have you heard? Have you seen? Have you been?

Based on these ‘1001 MUST’ type books and some quick calculations: assuming 74 minute long albums, 2 hour long films, 2 days per book and 7 days per place, it would take around 25 solid years to do all that we MUST do. Factor in sleep and other necessities, and you’re looking at around 50… Continue reading Have you read? Have you heard? Have you seen? Have you been?

Look→Left?

I’m often confused in situations like this: I glance ahead, and see ← LOOK LEFT, but I can also interpret ← LOOK RIGHT. This is because the words LOOK RIGHT are just as easy to read upside down. And despite the consistent left ← pointing arrow, the presence of the words LEFT and RIGHT add… Continue reading Look→Left?